Annie Leibovitz’s distinguished body of work encompasses some of the most well known portraits of our time. She began her career as a photojournalist for Rolling Stone in 1970, while she was still a student at the San Francisco Art Institute. Her pictures have appeared regularly on magazine covers ever since. Leibovitz became Rolling Stone’s chief photographer in 1973. By the time she left the magazine, ten years later, she had shot one hundred and forty-two covers and published photo essays on scores of stories, including her memorable accounts of the resignation of Richard Nixon and of the 1975 Rolling Stones tour. In 1983 she joined the staff of Vanity Fair and was established as the foremost rock music photographer and an astute documentarian of the social landscape. At Vanity Fair and later at Vogue, her work with actors, directors, writers, musicians, and public figures, as well as her fashion photographs expanded her collective portrait of contemporary life. She has also created several influential advertising campaigns, including her award-winning portraits for American Express and the Gap. Leibovitz has published several books, been exhibited widely, and is decorated with international awards.

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"There is no young photographer today who didn't wish they could be Gordon Parks."